Changing Eating habits in the UK

Eat the Best, Leave the Rest

Changing Eating habits in the UK

When it comes to a delicious snack, no-on else can really top the inventive concoctions Brits indulge in. Love a good snack? The perfect solution to fulfil a craving when you aren’t quite hungry enough for a full meal, but all you need is a quick solution to chase away the hunger pangs. Brits are never stuck for choice. The UK's eating habits have changed through the years. Purchases of white bread and full fat milk have dropped significantly. Skimmed milk overtook whole-fat milk in the 1990s and British households now drink four times as much. It seems like the staple ketchup might become a product of the past as well. Brits are shying away from the condiment and opting for more ‘exotic’ alternatives instead, like peri peri and sriracha. It might not always feel like it as you stand at the till, but doing the weekly shop has become more affordable over time. These days, of course, caring about what you eat is not just about ingesting food that will do you good, it means thinking about where your food comes from and how it's grown: is it free-range, fairtrade, organic? Locally grown, minimum food miles? Has it been sustainably caught, humanely raised, non-GMO farmed? Is it from a small-scale, independent producer or a big-food multinational monolith? Will the grower get a fair return for his produce, or is an evil supermarket chain constantly driving down prices? All of which means that real awareness of what we eat – food that is better for us, and for the environment – is essentially a middle-class preoccupation. It’s agreed that most people who eat badly do so not because they are uninformed about nutrition, nor because they live too far from a decent supermarket, but because bad food costs less, and tastes good. And so food has become, more than ever, one of the main indicators of social and class distinction in society. If we're well-off, we're more likely to eat well: fresh, unprocessed, nutritious, locally produced, bought at a farmers' market or small independent supplier. We may also, of course, choose not to eat well, for reasons of time and convenience. If we're not well off, we're more likely to eat badly: preserved, processed, high in sugar, fat and starch, mass-produced, bought from a convenience store or deep-discounter. We may also, of course, be poor yet choose to make eating well our top priority. Eating habits have changed through the years and whatever the conditions are, it is still up to us to go and get the healthy option. Don’t forget that; ‘We are what we eat’. Let’s try snacking healthy folks!